French Door Re-Do (The Big Reveal)

by Julie on January 24, 2012

Okay, so IT’S DONE.  I finished the doors.

If you read yesterday’s post, you know that I had plans for these doors and you know all about the frosted film “install”.  If you have any questions about how I did that part, please leave a comment and I’ll give you all the info.

Again, for the painting part, I used Behr Premium Paint + Primer in Black Suede (Semi-Gloss!) and I think the result is quite nice.

I apologize for the low-quality photos…the weather here is very cloudy…and our camera has gone missing. Ugh! The iPhone had to do…

Another little tidbit of information about painting French doors with all the individual panes – did I tape each piece of glass to avoid getting paint on it?  Uhhh…nope.  I am WAY too lazy for that action.  I just went crazy and painted outside the lines.

After the paint was dry, I went back and gently used a razor blade to remove the paint from the glass, being careful not to apply too much pressure and leave scratches.

If you decide to do this, please use caution with the sharp edges, and remember to keep them out of reach of children, dogs, or serial killers.

Before:

After!

No, it’s not perfect, but that’s not what we’re about here at Pushing Twigs. We’re just trying to reach a goal and get through it without death, destruction and dismemberment.

This was a pretty easy project that only took 3 days if you subtract the harassment from my little brood ;-)

What do you think?

Sharing with Between Naps on the Porch!

 

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Naida January 25, 2012 at 11:11 am

LOVE this. What did you use to opaque the glass?

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TwigPusher January 25, 2012 at 11:16 am

It’s a film that has adhesive backing on it…got it at Home Depot. Made by Gila. It comes in all kinds of colors and patterns. I found this in the window covering section where the blinds, shades and curtains are. It’s kind of like contact paper, but you spray some stuff on the glass (there’s a kit that you can buy with the film) and on the backing so that it slides around easily and you can get it into the right position, then you squeegee out the bubbles. Once it dries, it’s pretty much cured…not going anywhere. I applied it to the inside of the windows (inside the office) so I could paint the outside without goofing up the film. When it comes time to do the inside, I’ll probably need to use painter’s tape to protect the film.

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